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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> a look now at the cost of higher education. heads of universities in inyland, north carolina meet capitol hill to talk about higher education at lower cost. lawmakers are considering changes to the higher education act which is said to expire at year's end. two hours.ut >> today is the second in our series to examine post secondary education. discuss is ofill interest to policymakers -- that is innovation in higher education. we have spent time in this committee discussing the role of innovation, but much of that was focused on college affordability. while that is of paramount importance, we would like to thed this hearing examining landscape of innovations in higher education that increase student learning, engagement, and degree completion. if our nation is going to , we needore students to do more to ensure students are persisting towards and obtaining quality degrees. what can colleges and universities do to maximize learning and support? to ensure students are getting through on time, or faster and earning a meaningful credential. today's panel explores efforts and progress at the in
back to a point where you go through the normal process of moving the bills, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill pas
at the board of education meeting. she hopes to attend vanderbilt university to study medicine and one day join doctors without borders. i wish her luck in her future endeavors and i know she will make our fourth district proud. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from michigan is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week unfortunately food stamps will be cut by $5 billion. we expected that. mr. kildee: what's worse is even more deeper cuts could follow. conferees start negotiating a farm bill this week, and billions of dollars -- in fact, $40 billion have been -- in cuts have been proposed by republicans in the house. 10 times the amount of cuts passed in the bipartisan bill in the senate. i've talked to dozens of people in my district who since i've been here in congress have come up to me and said, you know, thank you for fighting to preser
starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmission. [ coyote howls ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? >>> the most consequential and hotly contested election this year will probably be in virginia one week from today. ken cuccinelli versus terry mcauliffe. even people who have voted republican forever say they are not going to vote for ken cuccinelli. who knows, miracles do happen in politics, but ken cuccinelli appears to need one. e.w. jackson trails b
day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. my turn daddy, my turn! hold it steady now. i know daddy. [ dad ] oh boy, fasten your seatbelts everybody. [ mixer whirring ] bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet, that acts like a big sheet. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. [ humming ] [ dad ] use less with the small but powerful picker upper. bounty select-a-size. and try bounty napkins. bounty select-a-size. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. >>> the most consequential and hotly contested election this year will probably be in virginia one week from today. ken cuccinelli versus terry mcauliffe. even people w
the past few decades, these public efforts have helped educate people and promote awareness about breast cancer. but we must remain vigilant in the fight because there's still so much more to be done. the statistics are sobering. one in eight women will get breast cancer in her lifetime. this disease strikes women and some men of all backgrounds, races, ethnicities and ages. while all women are at risk, many still think it can't happen to them, especially young women. but i know all too well that it can. in 2007 when i was just 41 years old, i learned i had breast cancer. while we've made significant advances on some fronts, recent studies show that more and more young women are being diagnosed with breast cancer and rates are not going down. i believe we have a responsibility as members of congress to take breast cancer awareness month one step further and turn awareness into action. we must take action to implement the affordable care act and continue to ensure that every single person in this country has access to the information they need to make informed decisions about their health
to the future, we need to make it stronger by improving worker training and education, upgrading our infrastructure, and growing our manufacturing base. the truth is, there are additional things we can add and do to make america even stronger as a magnet for investment. before talking about what make ours economy such an attractive place to invest, and what we plan to do to make it even more atrabtive, i'd like to start by saying a few words about the state of the world economy. there's broad evidence of recovery across the global landscape. economic conditions, particularly in advanced economies, have improved, but there's no doubt that global command is not where it needs to be. in too many countries, unemployment levels are unacceptably high, especially among young people. as i said before, leaders around the world should make strengthening demand and creating jobs a priority to unlock growth that's robust, sustainable, and balanced. looking at europe, it seems the long recession is slowly fading even as critical steps have been taken to restore financial stability. this is good n
, but more proud of title 9, 1973, this country came to make sure of equality for women in education and that includes sports. and the result is women in athletics that are amazing and entertaining. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. ellison: i congratulate them. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek wreck his? -- seek recognition? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to say thank you to a friend of mine, mayor james r. bobbing, who has dedicated 45 years of service to the city of granville in the second district. in the last 29 he he served as mayor. mayor bobbing has been recognized countless times for his leadership and commitment to west michigan. most recently he received the michigan municipal league michael a. guideo leadership and public leadership service award. in addition he serves as the chairman of the grandville council which plays a leading role in fostering public and private cooperation to enhance quality of
dew point me to talk. i can go back to the south of france. >> i want you to educate what report suggests that george w. bush tapped the phones of world leaders? >> when did this start? >> four or five years ago. >> 2002. >> 2002. >> the tapping of foreign leaders. >> yes. so you have to apply the same questions to president bush, first of all, whether they do or do not know. i think barnacle brought up the biggest point and that is the nsa overreaching in its power, is this something people want done but they don't want to hear about it. you got to look at that part of it too because we can apply this to a couple of different issues that we complained about or argued about on our set about the conduct of the bush administration. but i would say that most importantly, the important disconnect that i think is happening in this story is that people are thinking that like someone is sitting there listening to her conversations. the phone calls are being monitored. that's different than tapping the phone. >> this is gene. i did write about it this morning. >> i was reading that. >> t
is whoever wants to answer my brought commentary or at least educate me in a different lesson, i'd love to have it. >> in january 1963, the communists did something they hadn't done before. they stayed and they fought and as a result, five americans were shut down. we americans were killed. kennedy sees us on the front pages of the times and says what is going on here, i thought we were winning this war? over the course of the next several months, in fact, beginning january and february, he will hear varying reports from white house officials, state department officials and military officials. giving really contradictory evidence about the state of the military campaign in vietnam. >> john foster dulles had recently died in the super air powered in chantilly, virginia was being built. the president announced he would be named dulles airport. for a while, when kennedy took over, he didn't want to name it after a crusty old warrior. there is pushback and paella decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the film clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower thayer,
the former n-b-a star. in it, o'neal praises christie for his economic and educational policies. voters in the state head to the polls on november fifth. we're the biggest economy in the world.and some say, the most powerful. but a new study says we americans fall short on gender equality. zain asher has the story. forget the battle of men versus women. it's the u-s versus the world. and we're not doing too well when it comes to gender equality. the world economic forum looked at where men and women are most equal, and ranked 136 countries. number one? iceland. followed by other nordic countries like finland, norway, and sweden. but if you're looking for the u-s, we're not even in the top ten. nicaragua is ahead of us. so is cuba. the u-s doesn't even make the top twenty. to find us, you have to go all the way down number 23. last year, the u-s was number 22. so we've dropped. the u-s gets high marks for economic opportunity. specifically, there are more women in the work force, and pay is better than in other countries. the u-s also scores high on education for women. but the country f
receiving federal funds must ensure an education free of sexual discrimination. many colleges and universities say, they were unaware of their legal obligations under title 9 to also protect students from sexual assault. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism than preventing rape. that was a reality. >> although they graduated they found each other through the university community. they began to talk about the incidence of rape athe university of north carolina,. >> we said, it's a representation of a larger cultural problem. >> interviewing other victims of rape, utilizing social media, in january of 2013 along with former unc administrator melinda manning and two others, they filed a complaint against the university of north carolina at the department of education. >> when you have 18 and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government accountable for rape like it just -- it boggles my mind. >> as for annie and andrea they have turned their ordeal into a mission. a mission to bring light into a portion of campus light that shas been too lon
that values quick fix over education, a new teacher at garfield high school." that's wikipedia. here's rand paul. >> in the area of east l.a., in 1982, in an environment that values a quick fix on education over learning, escalante was a new math teacher. >> just look gattica. rand paul its reading wikipedia, passing it off. the entry continues. as the year progresses he is able to win over attention of the students by implementing innovative teaching techniques, able to transform the most troublesome teens into dedicated students. hit it, senator paul! >> as the year progress heed was able to win over the attention of students by implementing innovative teaching techniques he transformed even some of the most troublesome teens into dedicated students. >> wherever did you hear that? >> quoting wikipedia, while he teaches arithmetic and elementary intermediate alga bra, he realizes his students hatch far more potential. he decides to teach them calculus. go, senator, go. >> while he was teaching, he realized his students had far greater potential. he decided to teach them calculus. >> amazi
exciting thing may an entire industry of lower-cost educational devices that every student has. now suddenly, you have education content among not from textbooks, etc. we obviously are very focused for jobs reasons and infrastructure reasons to improve our airports, roads, bridges. we need all that, and that is partly an idea of fiscal of our tax laws. we're working on that. keep our eye on the 21st century because that type -- one of the first mover jumps that the united states got at the end of the 1990's is our small businesses and entrepreneurs were using the internet first and foremost. that generated a lot of inventory improvement, and growth and productivity spur we productivity's bird we had -- productivity spurt we had. one of things i want to say, we are doing selectusa here, but we learn from other countries. we look at what south korea is doing on universal broadband for schools. we listened, when the president did his in sourcing for them, he listened to other countries why they chose another country on things that we could have done better, and it has affected what we
come together to find smart answers, including retraining workers and providing education later in life. the good news is there are places where this important work is already being done. in philadelphia, they're confronting the problem head on with a program that is giving people new skills and new hope. so tonight we begin a new phase-in our advancing the dream series with the focus on training, on education, on finding common ground to close that skills gap. joining me now are sheila ireland, director of the program i just mentioned, the west philadelphia skills initiative and joyce bacon who's participated in the program. thank you both for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> sheila, you're able to really help people get skills and get the jobs that they need. how? >> well, over the time that we've been able to be doing the west philadelphia skills initiative, what we've come to understand is, is that in west philadelphia specifically, we've been mining local gold. there's talent in this ranks of unemployed people that you're talking about in terms of the skills gap. and what
's handling of health care and education, many democrats simply ignored her. and they haven't continued to ignore their gubernatorial nominee. it's true that democrats were probably not ever going to win this race. christie is simply too popular, thanks in part to his definite handling of hurricane sandy last year. democrats could have prevented christie from the sort of massive victory that he could use as a springboard for a 2016 presidential run. christie's campaign has not even tried to disguise that they want to run up the margins in this race so they can tell every republican who will listen that the state who re-elected barack obama by 17 points turned around the next year and backed chris christie by an even bigger margin. democrats could have denied him that. they could have worked to keep buono close, to keep christie from gaining momentum, from a massive victory in a blue state. instead, christie has built a 33-point lead without putting up any real fight on the democratic side. and that could come back to haunt them once 2016 rolls around. joining me now is e.j. dionne, a "w
an ambitious "back to work" public investment agenda in education, infrastructure which is in terrible shape in this country, renewable energy. and it was categorically ignored. yet the 90 tea party members in the house can shut down the government? >> well, you know, the desire of the progressive movement is for the democrats to act more like a party, to act more like a movement. and there are enough democrats in both houses of the congress to do that, but they need to be more disciplined. and also we need to realize that change doesn't happen from inside washington. it happens from the grassroots and then changes washington. >> but peter -- >> in congress. >> almost every other guest on this show says the same thing you did, that it takes time, it takes patience -- and it has to come starting with roosevelt, from the grassroots up. but we all know there's been great progress in this country on some cultural issues, particularly on gay marriage and equality for gays, but not much movement on the very issues that the people you describe are agitating about out there, environmental issues, in
under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping ] sounds good. campbell's healthy request. m'm! m'm! good.® [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. aveeno® so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there ar24/7.branches? i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to s
public and private investment in education r&d and infrastructure. over the last three years we've made real strides in reducing our deficit. we saved more than $12.5 billion. that's been unbalanced. about 70% has been from spending cut. 30% from revenue. we need to do more but we have do it, i believe, in a balanced way. we've heard from senators about the need to modernize the tax code and move toward real tax reform. while the committee can't get it done. we can move in that direction in a substantial way. making a modest cut of only 5% of the trillion dollars a year we spend through the tax code would make huge dent in the deficit. lastly, we have to don't make some reduction in direct spending. although i know that's the area taken the hardest hit. i'll insist on doing in a way that put a circle of production around around the most vulnerable and honoring our promises to seniors, veterans, and about to retirement to protect them from cuts. chairman rhode island i know, chairman muir ray. i'm glad we have come together. we need focus not on the area of disagreement but priority we s
would probably go abroad were you can get free education, free medical benefits, and not worry about the racial issues. host: if it is free, who pays for it to? caller: not sure who pays for the listening to your program and listening to other countries , i would less stressed at least give them an opportunity. you mean denmark, right -- right?er: caller: denmark. host: monti has this point -- you can call in to join the conversation -- do you feel you have the opportunity to get ahead in america ayako from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. -- in america? from michigan, jessica is up next. good morning. caller: it is hard to get ahead in america when asians are taking our jobs here and taking our jobs overseas. the media believes we need a bunch of schooling to get ahead. i think that is wrong. host: thank you for the call. looking at the comparison of the chart we showed you from 1952 -- james is next from grand forks, north to code up. you say you do not have the opportunity to get ahead in this country, why? i have to say no i have to say that is where i come from. , c-s
. >> you know why i'm here, really, i'm an educator now. what way? >> i'm trying to educate people to this problem of a fib. >> it's an irregular heartbeat. >> this affects like almost 6 million people. >> so you know? >> i know. >> she's an educator. >> and if you have it, you're five times more likely to have a stroke. so go easy on yourself. >> i thought your heart was just beating 'cause you were here. >> i'm excited, but i'm very close to having a stroke. but if you want to know more about it, i want to send people to fibs or fact.com. take a quiz. like deal or no deal. for everybody that takes the quiz, not only do you learn something, but you end up -- >> i got a little problem. >> what? >> you're worried about giving people a sudden shock and there is 6 million people with afib, yet you want to stun people with your pranks show. and if someone has afib and on your prank show, without knowing it, you could kill them. >> or you could save their life. >> no. the point is, this is so common and if you know about it, you -- >> i didn't know. >> how did you find out? >> i was goi
and the senate we have robust beginning farmer and rancher legislation that focuses on education and building the capacity for the future. it also does some smart things to have set asides in some of these programs to make sure a new person on the land can access those things. i would certainly encourage us to come together. we're very close on that. keep those programs in there. once again, that builds our capacity for the future. in looking at capacity for the future, the land is our truly great resource. our producers are some of the best stewards of the land. but just like in all other things, we need to give them the tools they need to preserve that land. we need to make sure that conservation title is fully funded and we look visionary on those working lands to make sure we're not making the choices for those producers. they have the right to make the choice that works best for them. but make it both economically smart and people have proven they will take advantage of that. i would like to compliment my colleague from south dakota, who has worked with us on sod saver legislation that i
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. the end. lovely read susan. but isn't it time to turn the page on your cup of joe? gevalia, or a cup of johan, is like losing yourself in a great book. may i read something? yes, please. of course. a rich, never bitter taste cup after cup. net weight 340 grams. [ sighs ] [ chuckles ] [ announcer ] always rich, never bitter. gevalia. >>> a manhunt is under way for four escaped inmates that police are calling pretty crafty. the four made a daring escape from a local jail in caddo county early sunday morning. kerry sanders is standing by with the very latest on this. explain the crafty way these four escaped. >> reporter: well, very crafty because they found a hole in a system. but they found a way in a new system because the jail here is only really about a year old. $11 million spent for the new jail and the court complex here. the sheriff is here right now. sheriff gene cain, i'm sort of c
. of providing a free world-class education for anyone, anywhere. if you look at a khan academy video, they cover everything from basic arithmetic to calculus, trigonometry, finance. you can really just get what you need at your own pace. and so, bank of america came and reached out to us and said, "we are really interested in making sure that everyone really understands personal finance." we're like, "well, we're already doing that." and so it was kind of a perfect match. we don't have time for stuff like laundry. we're too busy having fun. we get everything perfectly clean by tossing one of these in the wash. and that's it. i wanted to do that. oh, come on. eh, that's my favorite part. really? that's our tide. what'sours? ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. >>> 20 minutes past the hour and time for the daily slide show. a deadly storm with hurricane force winds slamming several european nations. at least 13 people reported dead. officials say the storm knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of homes and this is the wors
of their teams. it gave me a chance to use my education a little bit. >> you say you're one of the most unlikely people to get to the hall of fame, in fact most unlikely to get to the nba. why? >> i didn't fit any of the profiles. i'm a very small guy and there's nothing about me that stood out. i needed teammates to be good. i didn't go out there and score a million points or do anything by myself. i needed guys around me. little by little things pointed in that direction. >> you go to gonzaga, after your second year you begin to shine. you say your parents didn't think you would play past ninth grade. >> we had chances to raise money for basketball tournaments and they always were willing to buck up for one of their four children because they figured it would be my last harrah. >> you came up in an era where there was no parents organizing things. you were playing pickup football, pickup basketball, anything else. >> riding books anywhere. right around the neighborhood, see what you can find. >> you talk about going into the hall of fame. you go in with who? david robinson and a guy named? >>
awards. through his passion for art and education, george berry sr. has made a tremendous impact on many mississippiians and others throughout this country. george was born in oklahoma and at the age of 6, george was taught wood carving by his father. he moved to mississippi in 1972 to teach industrial arts at the piney woods school, an historically african-american school located in rankin county, mississippi. a year later he became a charter member of a program created to create folk art within the state. after retiring from piney woods in 1984, george berry has dedicated a majority of his time to wood carving. even so, he continues to spend a great deal of his time teaching others. george teaches weekly classes for the mississippi craftsman skill and frequently instructs student at the allison wells student of arts in cranton, mississippi. additionally, he's taught at the john c. campbell folk school in brasstown, north carolina. george berry's preference in style is reflected in his large body of work. his realistic depictions of nature are the constant theme in his artwork. many of
, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- $125 a week.g on if they take food stamps away --m me -- the [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that he gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a inm bill, that law expired 2008. what is it 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill passed. the fact they are going into conference to sit down in both chambers, that is huge. that is something. he is ch
millions of visitors are not just entertained but educated and inspired. >> people are having less and less daily encounter with animals, and so these kinds of exhibits are teaching people about the wild. if people don't know animals, they won't care about them. >> and martin savidge joins me now. i just wrote down the tweet from your piece. can can never be happy at seaworld again. talk about a film that has illicited su eed such a strong e from people. is that the bigger camp or are others really defending seaworld? >> on social media, this story is on fire. i would say 99% are critical of s seaworld, but keep in mind, many of those speaking out are animal activists and social media tends to be used more by younger people. thereby, it isn't a direct measure of what america is thinking, but right now, a lot of people online don't like this idea of killer whales in captivity. >> what about the business of seaworld itself? too early to tell? >> it is right now because it's just too soon. i think already we know that seaworld had been seeing lower attendance figures this year. they blame in p
. i'm proud of my surveys and i appreciate the education and opportunities that i got from them. i know that most veterans don't want to see the tax payers abuse or money wasted, even in the va. we have this -- i want to commend mr. griffin for the work they've done. they have the report that says there was an e-mail and much one department employee said where large agency with deep pockets. this e-mail response was indicative of a large problem throughout the plant has disregarded any budgetary concerns and engage in out-of-control spending. they exercise stewardship of taxpayer dollars. that's a very disturbing report. farrisee, and attend a massive $7 trillion debt to set up a notch higher, much faster than ever before, how does this statement with deep pockets. had he think that reflects on the department? >> it's a very troubling statement, congressman. i cannot believe it reflects well. i do not believe that is the thought process today. i believe that fiduciary responsibilities are taken seriously in the policies put in place will eliminate those types of thoughts. >> well,
care and higher education. then we filtered those areas with high crime rates and cost of living. >> let's take a look at austin, texas, number five on your list. what's special about austin? >> home to ut. active to higher education and also many high tech jobs in that area. >> also oklahoma city, a great city hiring veterans. what's so special about oklahoma city? >> oklahoma city in fact has been on our top ten list three out of the last four years. they are enjoying job opportunities with the oil and exploration boom and they have one of the lowest cost of living. >> minneapolis, minnesota was number three. low crime in that city, right? >> yes. lowest crime rate of the top ten. also it's the highest average household income of the top ten as well. >> number two on your list is dallas, texas. >> dallas, texas, faired very well. it's a combination of a vibrant economy and affordability as well as again benefitting from the recent oil, gas and mineral exploration boom. >> that's been in your top ten three out of the last four years. drum roll, please. what's the number one city
partners have throughout atives the country to educate americans about cybersecurity. cyberspace today is linked into every aspect of our daily lives and efforts such as this are crucial to creating a safe, secure and resilient cyberenvironment. i hope my colleagues will join me in congratulating all who made cybersecurity awareness month a success. thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. johnson: mr. speaker, i rise to recognize an everyday hero, a young constituent of mine who has set an example we would all do well to follow. mary patricia hecter, a 15-year-old from georgia refused to sit idly by while children across the nation died in playgrounds, while funerals outnumbered graduation ceremonies and where violence begot more violence. she had a campaign to combt youth gun violence, aptly named think twice. her campaign encourages youth to think
that is specifically designed for either outreach and education, so health centers hired education and outreach people as part of their outreach for health personnel. i would say it's definitely related cause to get expanded health care. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. chairman, thank you madam secretary for being here. my understanding is that a lot of the companies insurers that have been offering plans in the individual market, the ones sending out these notices, are actually repositioning themselves in the health insurance exchange to offer alternative plans. is that -- >> yes. >> and in addition to those insurers who have been in the individual market, you have a lot of other companies and insurers providing plans in health insurance market? >> that is true. >> so the way i look at this. i went to buy oriole tickets when the season was underway. they closed the window. i didn't have to go home because they opened another window a few feet away. so essentially what's happening is people are coming up on the renewal period and getting up to the window, the individual market and being
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)